Honda Refrigerant Capacity Chart (Updated 2022)

Cars with a cooling system or air conditioner are fueled by refrigerants or freon. Depending on your car’s model, the quantity of refrigerant every car can take varies. 

Let’s say Mr. A owns a Honda Civic and Mr. B owns a Honda Accord, both owners cannot just assume their cars should contain the same amount of refrigerant. They must first check to know the capacity of their system. 

In this guide, you will be getting first-hand access to the refrigerant capacity of popular Honda vehicles and basic safety practice instructions.

honda refrigerant capacity chart

Honda Refrigerant Capacity Chart (by Model & Years)

Model Year Of Manufacture Freon Filling Quantity
Honda Accord – Denso Compressor 1993-98 R134a 700-750
Honda Accord – Denso Compressor 1998-03 R134a 500-550
Honda Accord – Hadsys Compressor 1993-98 R134a 700-750
Honda Accord – Sanden Compressor 1998-03 R134a 500-550
Honda Accord 2,0i/2,4i 2003-08 R134a 500-600
Honda Accord 2,0i/2,4i/2,2D-i-DTEC 2008.07 > R134a 475
Honda Accord 2,2D i-CTDi 2003-2008 R134a 450-500
Honda Accord Aerodeck/Coupe – Denso Compressor 1994-97 R134a 600-650
Honda Accord Aerodeck/Coupe Hadsys Compressor 1994-97 R134a 600-650
Honda Accord Coupe 1998-03 R134a 600-650
Honda Accord Diesel LHD 1996-98 R134a 650
Honda Accord Diesel RHD 1996-98 R134a 700
Honda Civic – Denso Compressor 1994-95 R134a 500-550
Honda Civic – Matsushita Compressor 1994-95 R134a 500-550
Honda Civic – Sanden Compressor 1994-95 R134a 500-550
Honda Civic 1,7D CTDi 2002-06 R134a 500-550
Honda Civic 2/3/4-door – Denso Compressor 1996-00 R134a 600-650
Honda Civic 2/3/4-door – Sanden Compressor 1996-00 R134a 600-650
Honda Civic 5-Door 1995-97 R134a 500-550
Honda Civic 5-Door – Denso Compressor 1997-00 R134a 500-550
Honda Civic 5-Door – Sanden Compressor 1997-00 R134a 500-550
Honda Civic 5-Door Diesel LHD 1997-00 R134a 640
Honda Civic 5-Door Diesel RHD 1997-00 R134a 560
Honda Civic Hybrid IMA LHD 2006-10 R134a 425
Honda Civic Hybrid IMA LHD 2006-10 R134a 475
Honda Civic IX 1,4i-VTEC/1.8i-VTEC/2,2Di-DTEC LHD 2012 > R134a 380
Honda Civic IX 1,4i-VTEC/1.8i-VTEC/2,2Di-DTEC RHD 2012 > R134a 420
Honda Civic VIII 1,4i/1,8i 2006 > R134a 450-480
Honda Civic VIII 2,2D i-CTDi 2006 > R134a 450-480
Honda Civic/Civic Coupe (EU/EP/EM) 1,4i/1,6i/2,0i 2001-06 R134a 500-550
Honda Concerto 1993-95 R134a 750-800
Honda CR-Z 1,5 Hybrid IMA 2010 > R134a 475
Honda CRV (RD) 2002-07 R134a 480-530
Honda CRV 2,0i/2,2D-CTDi/2,4i 2007 > R134a 465
Honda CRV 2,2D i-CTDi (RD) 2004-07 R134a 450-500
Honda CRV RHD 1997-02 R134a 600-650
Honda CRX – Denso Compressor 1994-97 R134a 500-550
Honda CRX – Matsushita Compressor 1994-97 R134a 500-550
Honda CRX –Sanden Compressor 1994-97 R134a 500-550
Honda FR-V 2007 > R134a 550
Honda FR-V Denso Compressor 2005-07 R134a 550
Honda FR-V Sanden Compressor 2005-07 R134a 550
Honda HR-V (GH) with air conditioner at the rear 1999-06 R134a 750
Honda HR-V (RU) 2014.11 > R1234yf 420
Honda HR-V 1,6i 1999-06 R134a 550-650
Honda Insight 1,3i DSi-VTEC (IMA/Hybrid) LHD 2006 > R134a 425
Honda Insight 1,3i DSi-VTEC (IMA/Hybrid) RHD 2006 > R134a 475
Honda Jazz 2008-15 R134a 400
Honda Jazz (GD) 2001-08 R134a 400-450
Honda Jazz IV (GK) 2013.09 > R1234yf 400
Honda Legend 1996-00 R134a 700-750
Honda Legend – Denso Compressor 1993-96 R134a 750-800
Honda Legend – Hadsys Compressor 1993-96 R134a 750-800
Honda Legend IV (KB) 3,5i/3,7i 2006.05 > R134a 475
Honda Prelude 1997-01 R134a 700-750
Honda Prelude LHD 1994-96 R134a 600-650
Honda Prelude RHD 1994-96 R134a 650-700
Honda S2000 1999-04 R134a 600-650
Honda Shuttle 2,2i/2,3i 1995-01 R134a 600-650
Honda Shuttle 2,2i/2,3i with air conditioner at the rear 1995-01 R134a 800-850
Honda Stream 1,7i 2001-06 R134a 500-550
Honda Stream 2,0i 2001-06 R134a 500-550
Honda Stream 2,0i with air conditioner at the rear 2001-06 R134a 700-750

How To Know If Your AC Overcharged With Refrigerant?

If your Honda AC system has more than enough refrigerant, these are symptoms to watch out for:

Frost Layers – Frost layers are a common sign related to refrigerant level. They appear when the refrigerant in your car is too much or running low. Although most car owners usually know the status of their refrigerant when they see this sign, if you are uncertain, call a professional.

Higher Heat Discharge – If the air coming out of your car’s vent is extremely hot, the system may be producing extra heat from the inside. This occurs when you overwork or overpower the condenser. If this happens after recent maintenance (including refrigerant recharging), you are likely dealing with an overcharged system.

Squealing from the Compressor – Refrigerant is a liquid released as a gas via the compressor to provide the cooling effect you enjoy while driving. This system functions based on pressure, hence, when there is too much pressure, the liquid forces its way into the hose. This results in a squealing sound and can damage the entire system in the long run.

Uneven Pressure Levels – You need some special equipment to check for uneven pressure. This is why this part is best handled by an expert. The whole procedure involves examining the pressure reading and further troubleshoots.

Shutting Down Completely – You must have seen any of the signs above and ignored them for this to happen. At this point, the system’s compressors are burnt and the only way to resolve it is to call a professional.

AC Recharge Safety Instructions 

When refilling or working on a refrigerant system, make sure you adhere to these instructions:

  1. Wear protective gloves and Google always. They prevent your skin and eye from direct exposure.
  2. Do not modify the default or factory setting of the adjusting screw on the expansion pipe.
  3. If somehow, your skin gets in contact with the liquid (refrigerant), rinse thoroughly with cold water and seek medical attention immediately.
  4. Your workplace must be adequately ventilated. A workplace with poor ventilation can increase the concentration of the refrigerant, which might lead to dizziness. 
  5. Smoking should not be allowed during any refrigerant procedure. Smoke breaks down the fluid into a poisonous substance. The same can be said for fire or hot metal.
  6. Always keep the air-conditioning system closed unless there is a need to open it. This is because refrigerants should not get overly exposed to the atmosphere.
  7. Do not at any point direct the service tubes towards you during disconnection. 
  8. Stem-jet cleaners should also steer clear of the refrigerant system during cleaning.

Conclusion

Refrigerants are designed to make life inside your car enjoyable. However, too much of everything can sometimes be bad and that is the case for refrigerants. Excess recharge damages the compressor and fixing them is no cheap service.

Next time you are recharging your system or on maintenance duty, ensure the professionals stick to the designated quantity for your Honda (now that you know what it is).